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A Montessori classroom looks different from others because it is prepared for the convenience of the children rather than the adult.  It was this concept which led Maria Montessori to call her first school a “Childrens' House” or “Casa de Bambini”.
The class combines play and social skills with practical and academic achievements.   The children are free to move within the classroom, working with any of the material that they choose as long as it lies within their understanding.  Children are especially drawn to “real” activities such as buttoning, tying, pouring, scrubbing tables, sweeping, washing and slicing fruit to share as snacks.  These tasks appeal to children because they are real things that adults do, and it gives the child a sense of accomplishment and sharing.  All these exercises are a preparation for the academic skills the child will acquire in the future.  Concentration, sequencing one’s action, small and large motor development is all encouraged through these daily activities.  Our learning environment will enable the children to be active for long uninterrupted periods of time.  They will learn to make independent choices for themselves.